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Labrador Retriever Puppies / English vs. American
Breed Standards / Labrador Breed History

Yellow English Labrador Retriever Puppies for Sale

Born 7/20/16 ready to go 9/17/16
Located in Holly Hill between Charleston and Columbia

Beautiful Calm English
Labrador Retriever Puppies.
Pet, Hunting, Show

Remember Sago Palms Tree's are extremely poisonous to dogs, especially puppies!!!

 

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AMERICAN vs. ENGLISH

There is only one breed of dog known as the Labrador Retriever, described by the Standard of the Breed. Within Labrador Retriever breed type there are variations in body style which have evolved to suit the use of the dog, as well as the preferences of individual breeders and owners. In the United States the general public has begun to label these variations mistakenly as "English or "American" style. Perhaps a better description for variations in style is "show/conformation" or "working/field" styles.

The working/field or "American" style of dog is the label often attached to a Labrador possessing lighter bone structure and exhibiting more length of leg, a less dense coat, and a narrower head with more length of muzzle.

The conformation/show or "English" style Labrador is generally thought of as a stockier dog, heavier of bone and shorter on leg and with a denser coat, and having a head often described as "square or blocky." However, working/field variations occur in England as well, so this description is not necessarily suitable.

These general images portray the extremes of both styles and do not help to identify the temperament, trainability or health of the dog.  In fact, the vast majority of Labrador retrievers, whether of conformation/show breeding or working/field breeding, possess moderate body styles much closer to the written Standard of the breed. It is possible that within a single litter, whether that litter has been bred for show/conformation or working/field, individual pups can mature to be representatives of the range, though rarely producing the extremes, of the two styles. We recommend that you discuss the issue of size and style, as well as temperament, trainability and health, with any breeder you contact. However, please remember that there is only one Labrador Retriever breed, one that meets the requirements as set forth in the Official Standard.

http://www.thelabradorclub.com/subpages/show_contents.php?page=English+vs.+American

 

 The Breed History

     Newfoundland was settled by English fisherman as early as the 1500's and the St. John's dogs seemed to develop along with the fishing occupation. The English fisherman in Newfoundland used the St. John's dog to retrieve fish that had fallen off their hooks as well to help haul in fishing lines through the water. The St. John's dogs were considered "workaholics" and enjoyed the retrieving tasks given in the fishing environment. This breed was very eager to please and their retrieving abilities made them ideal for hunting companions and sporting dogs. In today's world many see their hunting companion as living for the sport. He will break ice to retrieve birds only to return and wait for the next one to come down. You have to keep an eye on the dog in warm weather as he will gladly work beyond his physical abilities and even overheat if you don't watch him. It was said that the dogs would work long hours with the fisherman in the cold waters, then be brought home to play with the fisherman's children. The wonderful temperament of the Labrador Retriever is documented back to its early days in England and has made them ideal family pets as well as accomplished sporting dogs.
     In Newfoundland the St. John's dog eventually became extinct. The reasons seem to be political. In 1780 the Governor wanted to encourage sheep raising and to stop any menace to sheep he ordered that there could be no more than one dog for a family. The St. John's dog were native to Newfoundland and so all but the ones that had been exported to England were vulnerable to this order. This action had a great impact on St. John's dogs since they were not wide spread and now their
numbers were being discouraged in their homeland.
St johns water dog     Above  are two of the last St. John's dogs in Newfoundland. Author Richard Wolters indicated in his book the Labrador Retriever that these two males survived extinction because they were in a very remote area. There were no female dogs left to breed to, so these appear to have been the last two original St. John's dogs. Wolters' book was published in 1981 and at that time Lassie (on the right) was 13 years old and his brother (left) was 15 years old.
Note these dogs also have the white toes and muzzle like the early Labradors in England. This trait appears to have been bred out of the dogs since the only white markings AKC allows at this time is perhaps a small white spot on the chest. Sometimes one will find some white hairs on the toes or foot pads still today. That likely traces to the original dogs.
http://www.chocolatelabs.co.uk/html/labrador_history.html

The fishermen used dogs to retrieve fish that fell off hooks and to help haul in swimming lines or fishing nets. These dogs needed to be eager to please, strong swimmers and small enough to haul in and out of the two man " Dory" type boats. They needed to have short, water repellent dense coats that could withstand very cold water and wouldn't ball up with ice or bring excess water onboard. Onshore, as temporary settlements gave way to more permanent ones, a retrieving dog would have been a very useful hunting companion. The St. John's area of Newfoundland was settled predominantly by Englishmen who brought these working dogs to England through Poole Harbor, Dorset, the hub of the Newfoundland fishing trade. These St. John's dogs became the most prized sporting dogs for the gentry who could afford to maintain kennels for controlled breeding.
     Without written records from the earliest days to detail which dogs came from where and to whom they were bred, we can only speculate about the ancestors of these St. John's dogs. The black St. Hubert's hound from France, working water dogs from Portugal, old European pointer breeds and dogs belonging to the native Indians have all been suggested as possible predecessors. Certainly some mixture of these or others is logical since tradesmen from around the world frequented Newfoundland for several centuries, plenty of time to develop breeds with the desired working traits. Two distinctly different breeds resulted, the larger longer haired dog used for hauling that became the Newfoundland we know today and the smaller shorter coated retriever that led to our present day labs. See the breed " standards" which detail form and function specifications for Labradors. 
http://www.alllabs.com/labrador_retriever_history.htm

 

The fishermen used dogs to retrieve fish that fell off hooks and to help haul in swimming lines or fishing nets. These dogs needed to be eager to please, strong swimmers and small enough to haul in and out of the two man " Dory" type boats. They needed to have short, water repellent dense coats that could withstand very cold water and wouldn't ball up with ice or bring excess water onboard. Onshore, as temporary settlements gave way to more permanent ones, a retrieving dog would have been a very useful hunting companion. The St. John's area of Newfoundland was settled predominantly by Englishmen who brought these working dogs to England through Poole Harbor, Dorset, the hub of the Newfoundland fishing trade. These St. John's dogs became the most prized sporting dogs for the gentry who could afford to maintain kennels for controlled breeding.
     Without written records from the earliest days to detail which dogs came from where and to whom they were bred, we can only speculate about the ancestors of these St. John's dogs. The black St. Hubert's hound from France, working water dogs from Portugal, old European pointer breeds and dogs belonging to the native Indians have all been suggested as possible predecessors. Certainly some mixture of these or others is logical since tradesmen from around the world frequented Newfoundland for several centuries, plenty of time to develop breeds with the desired working traits. Two distinctly different breeds resulted, the larger longer haired dog used for hauling that became the Newfoundland we know today and the smaller shorter coated retriever that led to our present day labs. See the breed " standards" which detail form and function specifications for Labradors. 

http://www.alllabs.com/labrador-library/history-of-the-lab

Labrador Retriever This is Nell, the photograph dating from 1856 and is the earliest ever photo of a Labrador (St Johns Dog)

Buccleuch Avon was one of the founders of the modern Labrador, and he carried the "liver" gene. He is believed to be the ancestor of all chocolate Labs.

Buccleuch Avon was one of the founders of the modern Labrador, and he carried the "liver" gene. He is believed to be the ancestor of all chocolate Labs.

http://www.labrador-retriever-guide.com/images/xBen_of_Hyde.jpg.pagespeed.ic.dRphZCoBKu.jpg

This is the legendary Ben of Hyde.

Born in 1899 Ben was the first Yellow Labrador

Breed Standard

http://www.thelabradorclub.com/uploads/file/IlloStand2002.pdf

 

                               

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